Archive for March, 2011

Brown Rice Reduces the Risk of Type 2 Di

Brown Rice Reduces the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

Brown rice reduces the risk of developing type 2 diabetes whilst white rice increases the risk.
A number of studies looking at the effect of rice on type 2 diabetes risk have found the following:
• White rice – people who had at least 5 servings per week had a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those who had less than 1 serve per month
• Brown rice – people who had at least 2 servings per week had a lower risk for developing type 2 diabetes than those who consumed less than 1 serve per month
You can see from this data that 2 servings of brown rice per week can help to prevent type 2 diabetes. Whereas on the other hand the more white rice that is consumed the greater the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
This information is particularly beneficial for those people who already have type 2 diabetes or who are at risk of developing it.

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Brown Rice Better Than White…. There is

Brown Rice Better Than White….
There is little doubt that brown rice is more nutritious than white rice. It is less processed, higher in good quality soluable firbre and higher in nutrients. When brown rice is milled and polished to turn it into white rice a number of nutrients are greatly reduced. These include B complex vitamins (especially vitamin V3, B1 and B6), iron, manganese and phosphorus. Almost all the fibre and essential fatty acids are lost.

Brown rice helps improve digestive health
Rice bran is a soluable fibre and is high in brown rice but not white. It is a valuable source of food for the ‘good’ intestinal bacteria and can help to relieve a number of digestive complaints. It can help where there is excessive bloating and flatulence and is particularly beneficial after antibiotic possibly in conjunction with a good probiotic supplement.

Feeding beneficial intestinal bacteria is one of the easiest and most effective ways to improve digestive health. There is only space in the gut for a finite number of organisms. It stands to reason, the higher the population of ‘good’ bacteria the lower the population of ‘bad’ bacteria.

Other sources of soluable fibre include oats (oat bran), psyllium husks, slippery elm powder. Fruit and vegetables also contain soluable fibre.

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Losing Weight – The whole fruit is best…

Losing Weight – The whole fruit is best………

One of the best ways to lose weight is to eat less and the easiest way to eat less is to reduce feelings of hunger.
A study published in 2009 in the journal Appetite showed that eating a whole apple with skin reduced hunger and had a longer lasting effect than apple in other forms eg apple juice, apple juice with added fibre, apple sauce, apple without skin. In other words, eating a whole unpeeled apple made people feel full for longer.
For me there are no surprises in this research and you can actually improve on this result by having a few nuts such as almonds with the whole fruit. The addition of the nuts slows down the absorption of sugar from the fruit and gives a feeling of fullness for even longer and lowers the glycaemic index (GI). This means you have lower insulin secretion and a longer, more sustainable energy release.
Although the occasional unsweetened fruit juice will not do you a lot of harm it is important to ensure that the majority of your fruit intake is from whole fruit.

PubMed link

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=416%5Bpage%5D+AND+Flood-Obbagy+JE%5Bauthor%5D&cmd=detailssearch

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Losing Weight – The Whole Fruit is Best

One of the best ways to lose weight is to eat less and the easiest way to eat less is to reduce feelings of hunger.

A study published in 2009 in the journal Appetite showed that eating a whole apple with skin reduced hunger and had a longer lasting effect than apple in other forms eg apple juice, apple juice with added fibre, apple sauce, apple without skin. In other words, eating a whole unpeeled apple made people feel full for longer.

For me there are no surprises in this research and you can actually improve on this result by having a few nuts such as almonds with the whole fruit. The addition of the nuts slows down the absorption of sugar from the fruit and gives a feeling of fullness for even longer and lowers the glycaemic index (GI). This means you have lower insulin secretion and a longer, more sustainable energy release.

Although the occasional unsweetened fruit juice will not do you a lot of harm it is important to ensure that the majority of your fruit intake is from whole fruit.

 PubMed link

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=416%5Bpage%5D+AND+Flood-Obbagy+JE%5Bauthor%5D&cmd=detailssearch

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How to Prevent Migraines • Avoid trigger

How to Prevent Migraines
• Avoid triggering factors as much as possible
• Avoid becoming over-tired
• Avoid the build up of stress. If you know you are coming up to a stressful time seek treatment that will greatly reduce the effects of the stress. If you are a regular client at Herbal Nature give us a call and we can organise for you to pick up the appropriate medicines.
Or if you haven’t been to our clinic or if we haven’t seen you for some time you may need to make an appointment. It will be well worth it!
• Make time to relax regularly. If you feel your back, neck and shoulder muscles tensing up have a massage or acupuncture treatment to relieve the tension, thus reducing the likelihood of a migraine developing.
• Adopt stress management techniques that you enjoy. For example, regular massage and/or acupuncture treatments, yoga, Reiki treatments, make time for yourself on a regular basis.
• Use preventative treatments such as Feverfew and Willow Bark as used in the recent clinical trial.
• Acupuncture is very beneficial for the prevention of migraines.

There is much that can be done
Migraine is a complex condition and the mechanisms involved are not fully understood however there is much that can be done to prevent the occurrence of migraines or at the very lease reduce their frequency and severity.

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Triggers for Migraine Stress – One of th

Triggers for Migraine
Stress – One of the triggers for migraine in many people is stress, although the migraine may not occur until after the stressful event. Stress can initiate a migraine (or other types of headaches) because of the tightening of muscles around the neck and shoulders. Finding ways of management stress can be very beneficial. There are many herbal medicines that help the body to cope with stress much better and some are given specifically to prevent headaches and migraines associated with stress. Our clinical experience show that these work very well as part of the management and treatment of migraines.

Menstrual Cycle – Many women will experience migraines at specific times during their menstrual cycle. Most commonly the migraines will occur in the premenstrual phase however they can also occur at other times during the cycle. When headaches are associated with the menstrual cycle part of the treatment must include herbs can correct hormonal irregularities and/or the woman’s sensitivity to changing hormonal levels that occur naturally throughout the cycle.

Diet – Diet can definitely be a trigger for migraine in many sufferers. The offending foods vary greatly between individuals however the most common foods associated with the onset of a migraine include cheese, chocolate, citrus fruits and alcohol, especially red wine.

Sluggish liver function – The liver is responsible for many functions in the body however one of its major functions is the elimination of toxins. If there is reduced ability for the liver to perform this important task, toxins can build up and cause or contribute to the onset of migraine headaches.
Decreased liver function can also lead to food intolerances and sluggish bowel function, which further contributes to migraines.

Other triggers include too little or too much sleep, tiredness/fatigue, bright lights, noise, excessive heat or exposure to chemicals.

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Feverfew and Willow Bark for Migraines –

Feverfew and Willow Bark for Migraines – New Clinical Trial

There has been several clinical trials that show the effectiveness of long-term use of Feverfew for management of migraines. These trials demonstrate that it can take several months to have a significant reduction in the frequency of migraines. The length of time taken to achieve results may be dose related.

In a recent clinical trial researchers used much higher doses of Feverfew and combined it with Willow Bark. The trial went for 12 weeks in total and achieved the following results:

• a 57% reduction in the frequency of migraines within a 6-week period and a 61.7% reduction after 12 weeks of the herbal therapy
• a 38.7% reduction in migraine severity after 6 weeks and a 62.6% reduction after 12 weeks of treatment
• a 27.2% reduction in migraine duration at 6 weeks and a 76.2% reduction after 12 weeks

These results are very interesting and suggest that the combination of the correct dose of Feverfew and Willow Bark is well worth trying for the treatment/management of recurrent migraines.

If you have tried Feverfew previously and found it ineffective this new treatment regime may give better results.

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